jep3488@rit.edu 928-637-8105
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Dry Lake Hills Forest Thinning

ACE Arizona has completed an 18 week forest thinning project in the Coconino National Forest, in the Dry Lakes Hill Region. This area has not had previous fuels management, leaving it at high risk for future catastrophic wildfires and post-fire flood impacts. ACE has partnered with the City of Flagstaff Fire Department and the US Forest Service to complete this hand thinning project.  

Fire is a natural part of the ecosystem in this region. Historically, wildfires would burn through the understory, small trees, branches and dead trees, eliminating the excess of ladder fuels. For the last hundred years humans have been fighting these fires to protect properties and resources. When the fires do not run their natural course it leaves a surplus of ladder fuels causing the fire to become catastrophic, lighting up the fuels at the lower levels of the forest  and spreading to the canopy. Large trees that would normally not burn catch fire because of the surplus of lower level fuels.

In 2010, the Schultz fire burned 15,000 acres and caused between $133 and $147 million in economic damages to the Flagstaff community. The Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project (FWPP) conducted a study that concluded that post-fire flood impacts in the Dry Lakes Hills region has the potential to result in significant damage to downstream watersheds. Catastrophic wildfires cause severe floods because they burn the vegetation that would normally absorb the rainfall, leaving the ground charred, barren, and unable to absorb water.

The Forest Service silviculturist has written prescriptions for five sections of the 100 acre area being hand thinned by the eight person ACE crew. The crew will be felling trees  9 inch diameter breast height, and smaller.  After felling and bucking up the trees, the crew will be building piles for future prescribed fire operations. The project is being managed by City of Flagstaff Fire Department Operations Specialist, Matt Millar and lead by ACE crew leader, Katherine Dickey. ACE is proud to be a part of this partnership and to be creating a healthier ponderosa pine forest for the City of Flagstaff.

Thinning2.jpg
Forestthinnging1.jpg
thinning8.jpg
DSC_7859.JPG
thinning3.jpg
Thinning5.jpg
DSC_8631.JPG
thinning7.jpg
DSC_8478.JPG
DSC_7853.JPG
DSC_7951.JPG

Dry Lake Hills Forest Thinning

ACE Arizona has completed an 18 week forest thinning project in the Coconino National Forest, in the Dry Lakes Hill Region. This area has not had previous fuels management, leaving it at high risk for future catastrophic wildfires and post-fire flood impacts. ACE has partnered with the City of Flagstaff Fire Department and the US Forest Service to complete this hand thinning project.  

Fire is a natural part of the ecosystem in this region. Historically, wildfires would burn through the understory, small trees, branches and dead trees, eliminating the excess of ladder fuels. For the last hundred years humans have been fighting these fires to protect properties and resources. When the fires do not run their natural course it leaves a surplus of ladder fuels causing the fire to become catastrophic, lighting up the fuels at the lower levels of the forest  and spreading to the canopy. Large trees that would normally not burn catch fire because of the surplus of lower level fuels.

In 2010, the Schultz fire burned 15,000 acres and caused between $133 and $147 million in economic damages to the Flagstaff community. The Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project (FWPP) conducted a study that concluded that post-fire flood impacts in the Dry Lakes Hills region has the potential to result in significant damage to downstream watersheds. Catastrophic wildfires cause severe floods because they burn the vegetation that would normally absorb the rainfall, leaving the ground charred, barren, and unable to absorb water.

The Forest Service silviculturist has written prescriptions for five sections of the 100 acre area being hand thinned by the eight person ACE crew. The crew will be felling trees  9 inch diameter breast height, and smaller.  After felling and bucking up the trees, the crew will be building piles for future prescribed fire operations. The project is being managed by City of Flagstaff Fire Department Operations Specialist, Matt Millar and lead by ACE crew leader, Katherine Dickey. ACE is proud to be a part of this partnership and to be creating a healthier ponderosa pine forest for the City of Flagstaff.

Dry Lake Hills Forest Thinning
Thinning2.jpg
Forestthinnging1.jpg
thinning8.jpg
DSC_7859.JPG
thinning3.jpg
Thinning5.jpg
DSC_8631.JPG
thinning7.jpg
DSC_8478.JPG
DSC_7853.JPG
DSC_7951.JPG